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Diary of a Green Wedding #5: getting the bouquet out of the way early

By admin on September 21st, 2006 0 comments yet. Be the First


Hippyshopper editor Gabrielle (aka [GT]) chronicles trying to have a small, affordable wedding while pleasing her dreamed-of-a-fairytale-wedding- since-he-was-a-boy fiance John, and trying to keep her consumerism low.  But what to do about the bouquet?

Having decided what the invitations were going to be made of (stone, surprisingly enough) but not having actually completed the list of those to be invited – the "everything I can do" on that front having consisted of instructing John that he should sit down with his parents and hash out his side, lest we end up doing a Justice of the Peace thing downtown with random street people as witnesses (which would be entirely satisfying to me!) I decided I should start thinking now about the bouquet.  It, like the food, was going to be difficult, expensive, or both.

After hunting around online I found basically one aggressive purveyor of organic bouquets, named, err, Organic Bouquet.  They have a dozen Crown Majesty Esperance roses, organic, for $50 USD or two dozen for $65 (plus P + P).  They aren’t a bridal bouquet, just the traditional vase one, although that’s nothing some silk ribbon wouldn’t cure.  It’s a very good price considering what non-organic roses generally cost, and the Crown Majesty are particularly cross-bred to be long-lived.

I was surprised to not find any UK purveyors aside from Friendly Flower Company, which oddly has not even pictures of their work online, and no indication about prices – just an email address and a list of places they deliver to.  (Please do drop me a line if you know organic floral vendors!)

Considering that my dress and veil only cost £7.50 total, the idea of spending 3-4x as much on the most disposable part was very unattractive.  But if artificial flowers in the house are bad feng shui, then surely fake flowers in a wedding bouquet are even worse.  Then, of course, there’re all the corsages and boutonnieres.  Another objection to fake flowers is that they tend to offgas until they’re old enough to be full of dust (ie, there’s never a point at which they’re inoffensive). 

So what does that leave?  Origami? 

Maybe that’s not such a bad idea.

Seeing this picture of origami flowers for a wedding project has made me seriously consider doing all the flowers in origami.  We’ve got six months; is that enough time?  Craft projects always seem deceptively simple time-savers and end up driving you mad, wasting your time, and causing you to chuck it to get storebought anyhow.  So evidently the thing is to learn some origami over the next week and decide by Diary #6 if this is the solution.  It’d be a lovely use for John’s obsoleted-by-CD New Yorker collection.  (Yes, I am marrying an American, although I personally am not one.   Up Commonwealth!)    [GT]

See more Diary of a Green Wedding at Hippyshopper.

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